Sunday 27 April 2003

Dear Jaspers,

The jasper jottings email list has 1,022 subscribers to the full edition (317 AOL-ers plus 700 non) and 5 to the "slim pointer" message by my count.

Don't forget:

Th, May 1, 2003 - Fundraiser For Kevin O’Shea
                               MADISONS 1584 York Ave.
                                between 83rd and 84th Streets

Tu May 6,2003- Seventh Jaspers in Law Enforcement
                                Guest Speaker Hon. John Keenan 51
                               call Bob Van Etten 66 973-565-4330

Friday, June 6; Saturday, June 7; and Sunday, June 8 

Th Jul. 24 '03 - MC Young Alumni Happy Hour
                                Mad River Bar @1442 Third Ave.
                                RSVP: MurphGuide@yahoo.com

===

FUNDRAISER FOR KEVIN O’SHEA
Thursday, May 1, 2003
MADISONS
1584 York Ave. between 83rd and 84th Streets
 (212) 570-5454
6:00 P.M. -  Midnight
******
Open Bar - Hospitality Buffet - DJ - Dancing - Piano -Sing Along - Door Prizes
******
The Friends of Kevin O'Shea Committee respectfully suggest a door donation of $100 per person*.  This donation will help to defray the cost of Kevin's monthly living expenses and his continuing and inspiring rehabilitative response to his devastating paralytic injury of May 2001. Please make all checks payable to:
R. Hansen ITF the Kevin O’Shea Supplemental Trust
If you are unable to attend but wish to make a contribution, please mail your check to: Madisons, 1584 York Avenue,  NY, NY   10028

*Through the generosity of Madisons, Big City, Sessions 73, Anheuser-Busch and other distributors, 100% of the proceeds from this event will be contributed to Kevin’s rehabilitation.

===

Sesquicentennial Reunion 2003 

Friday, June 6; Saturday, June 7; and Sunday, June 8 

If your graduating year ends in a 3 or a 8, you are celebrating an anniversary.  Reunion is a time when the anniversary classes come together to make a gift to the College.  This year's classes are '38, '43, '48, '53, '58, '63, '68, '73, '78, '83, '88, '93 and '98.  If you are interested in your anniversary class gift, call Mary Ellen Malone, director of anniversary programs, (718) 862-7400 or Email: mary.malone@manhattan.edu 

Register on line!

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Closing Sesquicentennial Celebration
Alumni Reunion Weekend 
Saturday, June 7, 2003 
Mass - St. Patrick's Cathedral - 2:30 p.m. 
Reception - Rockefeller Center Plaza - 5:00 p.m.

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

http://www.manhattan.edu/alumni/events/reunion_reservation_form.html

On-Line Reservation Form

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

2003 Reunion Celebration Weekend

Friday, June 6 - Sunday, June 8

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Accommodations
 Check-in begins Friday, June 6
 Horan Hall 2:00pm
1 night @ $40 2 night @ $75
 
Prep Dinner
 Friday Faculty Dining Room
 6:00pm Please reserve  # attending   @ $30.00 pp  $
 
Mass - Class of 1953
 Saturday Main Chapel
 6:00pm Please reserve for me  # attending
 
1953 Welcome Party
 Friday Thomas Hall
 7:00pm Please reserve  # attending  @ $30.00 pp  $
 
College Awards Lunch
 Saturday     Please reserve  # attending  @ $50.00 pp  $
 
'78 Medal Presentation
 Saturday Waldorf Astoria
 1:00pm Please reserve  # attending
 NC
 
Eucharistic Celebration
 Saturday St. Patrick's Cathedral
 3:00pm Please reserve  # attending
 NC
 
Bus to Cathedral/Waldorf
 Saturday Guard Booth
 12 noon & 1:30pm Please reserve  # seats  @$12.00  pp

Closing Sesqui Celebration
 Saturday
 Rockefeller Plaza
 begins 2:30pm
 Please reserve for me  Tickets @ $100.00 pp
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Last Updated by Loretta Wilkins, Class of 2001
Copyright © 2002 [Manhattan College]. All rights reserved.
Revised: April 11, 2003

 

===

http://seattletimes.nwsource.com/html/localnews/134678081_newlibrary18m.html

=== <begin quote> ===

A school library arises from ashes

By J.J. Jensen
Seattle Times staff reporter

POULSBO, Kitsap County — Call it the magic of community.

That's how Principal Lynn Rasmussen describes the events that have taken place the past three months at her Breidablik Elementary School, nestled in the woods five miles north of here.

Since Jan. 13, when sprinklers in the school library caused more than $100,000 damage and ruined some 6,000 books, people in the community have logged thousands of hours ensuring the school's 500 students would again have a haven for reading and studies.

The fruits of their labor were revealed Friday, as the library was reopened with a new design — and new energy.

Rasmussen, a second-year principal, gets almost teary as she recounts the community's efforts.

"I love living in this small town," she said. "It's just good people. Salt of the earth to the core. This is magical."

When Rasmussen learned of a fire in the library in a 2 a.m. phone call, she never imagined events would turn out so positively.

She raced to the school and learned the fire had been sparked by a lamp that warms two bearded dragons the school had adopted. Though the fire itself was minimal, the automated sprinklers ran for an hour after it was extinguished, soaking the books.

In the wee hours, Rasmussen, along with firefighters and school librarian Mary Fox, began the arduous cleanup. As day broke, word of the fire spread. By 8 a.m. some 100 townspeople and staffers had joined the efforts. By noon, 200 people were on hand and all the books had been removed and placed in front of fans. Without the help, Rasmussen said, more of the library's 13,000 books would have been lost.

In the days and weeks that followed, Rasmussen was nearly overwhelmed with generosity.

Though insurance would cover repairs — and even allow the school to remodel the library with a Pacific Northwest theme depicting trees, ponds and beaches — the locals wanted to do more.

Several bookstores held book drives. Adults and children donated books from their private libraries. At their birthday parties, some students asked not for gifts but for family and friends to give books to the school.

To spruce up the new habitat-theme library, business owners and artists supplied additional crafts. Local artists built a pond and waterfall and painted bears and wolves on the walls. Craftsmen built a two-story treehouse and benches and lined bookshelves with branches and pine cones.

In all, Rasmussen said, more than 200 people and businesses contributed $10,000, and no one felt their work was more important than anyone else's.

"It's for the kids," said painter Wally Grenquist, whose son attended the school years ago. "There's a lot of artistic people in this part of the woods who wanted to do something special, and we have."

Kids were also impressed with the new digs, and that their bearded dragons, Kevin and Ishtar, would also be a fixture in the new library.

"It's awesome," said fifth-grader Abigail Campo. "Our library is very important to us. Everyone showed they cared about our library and education and wanted to help us."

Rasmussen hopes her students learned the power of community.

J.J. Jensen: 206-464-2386.

=== <end quote> ===

In essence, the people don't need government to do everything for them. Now a left coast or east cost "solution" would be to raise taxes to pay for new books. However the best solution would have been what a private company would have done – had proper insurance, had an owner who would ensure that everything was safe, and probably would have turned out the lights before going home. Sigh. But people who only have a hammer (government) see every problem as a nail. That doesn't take away from the people coming together as reported in this story.

Reflect well on our alma mater, this week, every week, in any and every way possible, large or small. God bless.

"Collector-in-chief" John

reinkefj@alum.manhattan.edu

=====

CONTENTS

 

0

Formal announcements

 

2

Bouncing off the list

 

4

Messages from Headquarters (like MC Press Releases)

 

1

Jaspers publishing web pages

 

3

Jaspers found web-wise

 

0

Honors

 

0

Weddings

 

0

Births

 

0

Engagements

 

0

Graduations

 

1

Obits

 

6

"Manhattan in the news" stories

 

0

Resumes

 

10

Sports

 

8

Emails

 

[PARTICIPANTS BY CLASS]

 

Class

Name

Section

????

Ciccolella, Richard S.

News5

1950

Brew, George

Email05

1953

Sullivan, Larry

Email02

1957

Hickey, Tom

Bouncing2

1959

Antenucc, John E.

Email03

1960

Bottlik Geza P.

Email07

1961

McNamara, John Patrick

Obit1

1964

Carr,  Robert

Email08

1965

Celenza, John

News1

1970

Peitler, Edward

Email06

1971

Bartus, John J.

Bouncing1

1975

Gonzalez, George

Found1

1977

Muolo, Michael

Email04

1978

Engels , Edward Robert

WebPage1

1979

Culley, Michael J.

Found3

1980

Walker, Gary E.

Found2

1996

Cafarelli, Vincent M.

Email01

2003

Cafarelli, Rich

Email01

 

[PARTICIPANTS BY NAME]

Class

Name

Section

1959

Antenucc, John E.

Email03

1971

Bartus, John J.

Bouncing1

1960

Bottlik Geza P.

Email07

1950

Brew, George

Email05

2003

Cafarelli, Rich

Email01

1996

Cafarelli, Vincent M.

Email01

1964

Carr,  Robert

Email08

1965

Celenza, John

News1

????

Ciccolella, Richard S.

News5

1979

Culley, Michael J.

Found3

1978

Engels , Edward Robert

WebPage1

1975

Gonzalez, George

Found1

1957

Hickey, Tom

Bouncing2

1961

McNamara, John Patrick

Obit1

1977

Muolo, Michael

Email04

1970

Peitler, Edward

Email06

1953

Sullivan, Larry

Email02

1980

Walker, Gary E.

Found2

 

[FORMAL ANNOUNCEMENTS ABOUT JASPERS]

[No Announcements]

 

 

[Bouncing off the list]

[JR: The following people have "bounced off" the list. Some bounces expose my poor administrative skills and I can not "who" bounced off. Thus the subscriber total may change more than are shown in this section. I have done what I can to notify them. If you can help "reconnect" – or "connect" new people -- I really appreciate it. And as always, I need your "news".]

Bartus, John J. (1971)

Hickey, Tom (1957)

 

[Messages from Headquarters
(Manhattan College Press Releases & Stuff)]

[Messages]

AFTER SEPTEMBER 11: IMAGES FROM GROUND ZERO
PHOTOGRAPHS BY JOEL MEYEROWITZ
Where:  Manhattan College
Alumni Room, O’Malley Library
W. 242nd Street and Broadway, Riverdale, the Bronx, NY
When:  April 10 –26
Noon-9pm    April 14, 15, 21, 22, 23, 25,26
Noon-6pm    April 17
Noon-5pm    April 24
ADMISSION IS FREE        
Catalogs are available at the check out desk for $10

Who:  Joel Meyerowitz, internationally known photographer, has published eleven books of color photographs as well as a book on the history of street photography. He is a Guggenheim fellow and a recipient of both the NEA and NEH awards. He recently completed his first film, "POP," a feature-length documentary about a road trip with his father.

Why: "Alone in there as the resident ‘eye,’ my task was to make a photographic record of the aftermath; the awesome spectacle of destruction, the reverence for the dead, the steadfast, painstaking effort of recovery, the daily life of those in the zone whose act of salvation had embedded itself deeply into the consciousness of all of us down there, and through them to all Americans and to the world"––– Joel Meyerowitz

CONTACT: For further information call John Wilcox at (718)862-7442

=

RABBI STEPHEN D. FRANKLIN TO BE HONORED AT MANHATTAN COLLEGE

RIVERDALE, N.Y.  --  Rabbi Stephen D. Franklin of Riverdale Temple will receive an honorary Doctor of Humane Letters degree on Tuesday, May 20, at Manhattan College’s 161st Spring Commencement in the College’s Chapel of De La Salle and his Brothers at 4:30pm.

During the ceremony, Manhattan College will award more than 200 degrees in the graduate programs of biotechnology, business, education and engineering as well as undergraduate degrees in organizational management or leadership studies through the College’s adult degree completion program.

Rabbi Franklin is in his 24th year with Riverdale Temple and is currently a member of the Executive Board of the Central Conference of American Rabbis.

Before coming to Riverdale, Rabbi Franklin was a Navy chaplain, serving at The Great Lakes Naval Training Center and at Camp Lejeune with the Marines.  While serving as chaplain, he was assigned to a battalion landing team with the Sixth Fleet in the Mediterranean.  He spent six years as assistant then associate rabbi of Holy Blossom Temple in Toronto and two years as associate rabbi of Reform Congregation Keneseth Israel in Philadelphia.

Rabbi Franklin graduated cum laude from Williams College with a degree in English and earned a bachelor’s and master’s degree in Hebrew Letters as well as his rabbinical ordination from Cincinnati’s Hebrew Union College-Jewish Institute of Religion.  He spent an additional year of study at Jerusalem’s Hebrew University.

Past president of the Riverdale Interfaith Clergy Conference of the Greater New York Association of Reform Rabbis, Rabbi Franklin received an honorary Doctor of Divinity degree from the Hebrew Union College-Jewish Institute of Religion in 1994.

==

MANHATTAN ALUMNUS, HENRY PETROSKI, ENGINEERING AND TECHNOLOGY EXPERT, TO DELIVER COMMENCEMENT ADDRESS

RIVERDALE, N.Y.  –  Henry Petroski, the Aleksandar S. Vesic professor of civil engineering and professor of history at Duke University and a 1963 graduate of Manhattan College, will deliver the keynote address for the College's 161st Undergraduate Commencement on Sunday, May 18.  During the ceremony, he will receive an honorary Doctor of Pedagogy degree.

Dr. Petroski is one of 11 Manhattan College alumni who are members of the National Academy of Engineering (NAE).  He was elected into the NAE in 1997 for his books, articles and lectures on many aspects of engineering and technology, including design, success and failure, error and judgment, the history of engineering and technology, and use of case studies in education and practice.  His books on these subjects, which are intended for professional engineers and general readers alike, include: To Engineer is Human, which was adapted for a BBC television documentary; The Pencil: The Evolution of Useful Things: Design Paradigms (named by the Association of American Publishers as the best general engineering book); Engineers of Dreams; Invention by Design; Remaking the World; The Book on the Bookshelf; and Paperboy.

Dr. Petroski’s next book, Small Things Considered: Why There Is No Perfect Design, will be published in September.

A resident of Durham, North Carolina, Dr. Petroski has been writing the engineering column in the bimonthly magazine American Scientist since 1991 and recently began writing a bimonthly column on the engineering profession for ASEE Prism.

Before joining Duke University in 1980, Dr. Petroski was on the faculty of the University of Texas at Austin and on the staff of Argonne National Laboratory.  He is a professional engineer licensed in Texas and a chartered engineer registered in Ireland.

Dr. Petroski has been a Guggenheim Fellow, a National Endowment for the Humanities Fellow, a fellow of the American Society of Civil Engineers, a fellow of the Institution of Engineers of Ireland and a Fellow of the National Humanities Center.

Manhattan College will award more than 520 undergraduate degrees in more than 40 major fields of study from its five schools in arts, business, education, engineering and science.  Graduation day begins with a Baccalaureate Mass at 10:00am followed by brunch on the Quadrangle prior to the Commencement ceremony at 1:00pm in the College's Draddy Gymnasium.

= = =

95 MANHATTAN COLLEGE STUDENT-ATHLETES MAKE DEAN’S HONOR LIST FOR FALL SEMESTER

RIVERDALE, N.Y.  – Ninety-five student-athletes at Manhattan College have earned Dean’s List honors by attaining a grade point average of at least 3.4 (on a 4.0 scale) for the 2002 Fall semester. The College has 19 varsity sports teams that compete on the Division I (NCAA) level.

= = = =

 

[JASPERS PUBLISHING WEB PAGES]

[WebPage1]

http://www.edandsue.com/bios.html

Bride: Susan Michelle Aschner
Birthdate: April, 1968
Birthplace: Chicago, Ill.
Hometowns: Buffalo Grove, Ill until age 7. Wayne, NJ through her remaining school years.
Graduted: Ramapo College, B.S. in Psychology
Current Residence: Kearny, NJ
Occupation: Project Manager of Information Technology.
Current Place of Employment:
Sue is temporarily on sabbatical, working at home setting up an internet company and portfolio.
Political Orientation: Libertarian
Hobbies Include: Knowing almost everything that exists on the internet, keeping up with neurological research, Fighting the war against the "War on Drugs", watching the NJ Devils, Boating, Snorkeling, Knowing the latest NYC Sushi Places, French Bistros and Sample Sales, and traveling with Ed.

Groom: Edward Robert Engels
Birthdate: November, 1956
Birthplace: New York, NY
Hometowns: Roosevelt, Long Island until age 13. Blue Point, Long Island for his remaining school years.
Graduated: Manhattan College, B.S in Accounting
Current Residence: Throggs Neck, NY
Occupation: CPA, Certified by NY State.
Current Place of Employment:
Ed has had his own successful CPA firm for the past 7 years.
Political Orientation: Conservative Libertarian
Hobbies Include: Fishing, Boating, Snorkeling, Planet-gazing, Talk Radio, Clinton Bashing, Watching news networks, watching the Yankees, Having much fun into the wee hours, Being known by everyone every where he goes, Knowing everything that is open late throughout NYC, "Creative" Accounting, and Frequenting the Caribbean.

[MCOLDB: 1978 ]

 

 

[JASPERS FOUND ON & OFF THE WEB BY USING THE WEB]

[Found1]

http://www.firstfinancialequity.com/profiles.asp

George Gonzalez
Vice President - Municipals
AZ,CA, CT, FL, MD, NC, NJ, NY, PA

George Gonzalez is an investment broker specializing in tax-free municipal bonds and government bonds since 1984. Whether working with an individual or group, his approach to investing is tailored to your needs and objectives.

George believes it is important to work with someone that is both knowledgeable of all the products available and ready to incorporate the appropriate product for each investor. A basic investment approach is a strong foundation upon which to build for wealth and security. George uses this concept to construct and cement your plan for the future.

George is a graduate of La Salle Military Academy (1971) and continued his academic education with Manhattan College obtaining his degree in 1975. He was honorably discharged from the Air Force, where he served in the 514th Military Airlift Wing. George is involved in the International Lions Club and is an active member of O.P.A.S., which helps senior members of our community in managing everyday life.

 

 

[Found2]

http://www.heroldhaines.com/bios/gew.htm

Gary E. Walker 

Gary was raised in Orange County, New York and now lives in Somerset County, New Jersey. He graduated summa cum laude with a degree in Accounting from Manhattan College in 1980, and graduated with Honors from Boston College Law School in 1983. In 1988 Gary enrolled in New York University School of Law's graduate tax program and received a Master of Laws in Taxation degree in 1992. 

        Gary worked briefly for Arthur Andersen & Co. in Stamford, Connecticut as a tax professional immediately after law school. He then became a Special Agent for the Federal Bureau of Investigation, assigned to the Alexandria, Virginia field office until 1986, when he went into the private practice of law joining the firm of Young, Rose and Millspaugh. Gary joined Herold and Haines in 1990 and became a shareholder and member of the Board of Directors of the firm in 1993.

          Gary specializes in the areas of trust and estate planning, trust and estate administration and litigation, and tax and business planning. He is a member of the Tax Law section and Real Property, Probate & Trust Law section of the American Bar Association and New Jersey State Bar Association. He is also a member of the National Academy of Elder Law Attorneys and the Elder Law section of the New Jersey State Bar Association. He is a past President (and a member of the Board of Trustees) of the Tri-County Estate Planning Council (active in Somerset, Middlesex, Union and Hunterdon counties, New Jersey). Gary is an instructor of Estate Planning and Estate Administration for the New Jersey Skills and Methods Program for newly admitted attorneys.

          Gary is on the Board of Trustees (former Chairman of the Board) of the Mid-Jersey Chapter of the National Multiple Sclerosis Society, and is a former member of the Board of Directors of the Somerset Hills Handicapped Riding Center (a non-profit organization which offers therapeutic horseback riding lessons to physically and/or mentally challenged individuals). He also serves on the Open Space Committee and Recreation Commission for Peapack-Gladstone, and coaches youth baseball and basketball.

          Gary, his wife Linda and their children, Lindsay (age 9), Ryan (age 5), Kelly and Tracy (twins, age 2), live in Gladstone, New Jersey.

 

 

[Found3]

http://eo1.gsfc.nasa.gov/Technology/SCBusDev-Paper.PDF  

Culley, Michael J. (1979)

 

 

[HONORS]

[No Honors]

 

[WEDDINGS]

[No Weddings]

 

[BIRTHS]

[No Births]

 

[ENGAGEMENTS]

[No Engagements]

 

[GRADUATIONS]

[No Graduations]

 

[OBITS]

[Collector's prayer: And, may perpetual light shine on our fellow departed Jaspers, and all the souls of the faithful departed.]

Your assistance is requested in finding these. Please don’t assume that I will “catch” it via an automated search. Sometimes the data just doesn’t makes it’s way in.

[Obit1]

Copyright 2003 News & Record (Greensboro, NC) 
News & Record (Greensboro, NC)
April 21, 2003 Monday ALL EDITIONS
SECTION: TRIAD; Pg. B6
HEADLINE: OBITUARIES

JOHN PATRICK McNAMARA

Mr. John Patrick McNamara, 71, of 102 Homewood Ave., died on Good Friday, April 18, 2003, at his residence.

A Mass of Christian burial will be held at 10 a.m. Wednesday, April 23, 2003, at Our Lady of Grace Catholic Church. Interment will be private.

John Patrick McNamara was born in Bronx, N.Y. on Aug. 12, 1931, to the late Patrick and Catherine OSullivan McNamara. He was a graduate of All Hallows High School and Manhattan College. He served in the U.S. Army during the Korean war. He retired after 39 years from AT&T as an electrical engineer. John started his career with the New York Telephone Company in Bronx, N.Y. During his career he worked throughout New York City and Long Island. He worked with American Bell International in Tehran, Iran; he relocated to Greensboro in 1981.

Survivors include his wife of 50 years, Marilyn McNamara of the home; four children, Cathryn McNamara of Greensboro, Richard McNamara and wife, Nanette of Long Island, N.Y., John McNamara of Alexandria, Va. and Christopher McNamara and wife, Susan of Bradford, Mass.; and four grandchildren, Riley, Kelly, Anne and Lynne McNamara. He will also be missed by numerous nieces, nephews, godchildren, extended family and friends.

In addition to his parents, Mr. McNamara was preceded in death by two sisters, Margaret Maroon and Mary Catherine McNamara; and a brother, Daniel McNamara.

The family will receive friends at Forbis and Dick North Elm Street from 7 to 9 p.m. Monday evening, 3 to 5 p.m. on Tuesday afternoon and 7 to 9 p.m. on Tuesday evening with a Rosary service at 7:30 p.m.

Memorials may be made to the American Heart Association, or to Hospice at Greensboro, 2500 Summit Ave., Greensboro, N.C. 27405.

LOAD-DATE: April 21, 2003 

[MCOLDB: 1961 ]   

 

[News MC]

[News1]

http://www.jcelenza.com/

Layoffs
by John Celenza (1965)

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

In my 17 years in computer engineering, I have witnessed 16 layoffs. Twelve, I survived; four, I didn't. Layoffs the price of being in any rapidly changing field. Frequent innovations in technology make some companies successful, only to be followed by further innovations making other companies successful at the expense of their predecessors. Twenty years on the line is a rarity in high tech. Even IBM's policy of jobs for a lifetime has recently been reversed.

A layoff isn't pleasant for anyone. It is a time of insecurity and disruption. Before the event, every word and action of management is scrutinized for signs of when and who. The distraction of hallway discussions becomes endemic. The enthusiasm for projects dissipates.

When the moment arrives, the stomach tightens whenever the manager's door opens to admit the next person. Tension remains high until the ordeal is over. Afterwards, long-established work friendships are often strained. The routine flow of work bogs down in the weeks-long reassignments of responsibilities. Vacant offices are sobering reminders of the short-lived nature of our jobs.

It is much more unpleasant when you're the one laid off. The next job may come soon, but sometimes the months of looking drag on. It is an old but somewhat fallacious rule of thumb that it will take one month for every $10,000 in salary to find a new position. Often it does take from five to eight months. Bills mount up as savings are consumed and unemployment compensation makes up for only a fraction of your past salary. The routine of searching newspaper job listings, phoning colleagues, or inquiring with recruiters grows tiresome.

It may be corporate sacrilege to recommend starting a job search when layoff rumors begin, but it is the wisest thing to do. Most layoff rumors prove true. You, your family, and your career are at risk. Just as the company needs to put return to stockholders first, you need to put your financial well-being first. The time to act is when your job is threatened, not when it is lost.

Companies can and often do provide guarantees of job security. One firm offered me an 18-month contractual guarantee of salary during one particularly troubled time. In the absence of such commitments by the company, however, don't gamble with your future. Begin the search before you lose your job. Start making calls. Start sending out resumes. Start scanning the newspapers. Go to the next Westech career fair.

Your search should be active but not obvious. The purpose of starting early is to shorten your unemployment, should it come. But you may not be laid off, and flaunting your search is bound to leave a bad taste in the mouths of your management. This does not by any means imply that you should be secretive. In fact, I usually inform my immediate supervisor that I have started my search in case I am let go. Sometimes, you may be told you're not on the layoff list, which can greatly reduce your worry. But many times, your supervisor can't tell you. You need to strike a common-sense balance between openness and secrecy. Most of all, avoid the extreme of broadcasting what you're doing to everyone.

One of the greatest dangers associated with being laid off is loss of self-esteem. You begin to feel inferior. After all, didn't others survive when you fell to the axe? You must have done something wrong. The truth is that in most layoffs it's jobs, not individuals, that are eliminated. When management makes the hard layoff decisions, they more often ask which tasks can be delayed or dropped rather than which people are the "bad" workers. Individuals stay or go on the basis of whether their jobs are necessary, not how well they did them. There are exceptions to this; organizations are as individual as the people running them. Sometimes less-than-professional managers will use layoffs to rid themselves of workers they don't like. But on the average, corporations behave dispassionately while "re-sizing."

Finally, you may feel betrayed by your company, but you weren't. It would be pleasant to have our jobs secured for life, but companies need to expand or reduce head-count to survive in the highly competitive world especially in high-technology industries. If the company doesn't survive, neither does your job. A layoff doesn't make your company a bad company. The best advice is, take layoffs in stride. They are an unpleasant but inherent part of our system.

---

John Celenza is a managing partner of Tri-Coastal Management Systems and was formerly Engineering Manager with Nicolet, GenRad, and KLA Instruments. He has also worked with a number of start-ups, most recently with Neuristics and International MultiSystems. He has been involved with software and hardware computer engineering since 1974.

 

 

[News2]

http://www.rockawave.com/news/2001/0707/Society&Community/Rockaway_Finest0707.html

Kristin Hutton of Belle Harbor received the Presidential Scholarship to Manhattan College, the Academic Achievement Award to St. John’s University, NY and the Merit Scholarship to St. Peter’s College, NJ. Kristen will be attending Manhattan College in the fall.

 

 

[News3]

Serious academic approach to the study of peace
Kim Campbell Staff writer of The Christian Science Monitor
04/22/2003
FEATURES, LEARNING
Christian Science Monitor
ALL
15
(Copyright 2003)

   When Pope John XXIII wrote about the need for universal peace in April of 1963, faculty at Manhattan College, a Catholic school in the Bronx, started thinking about how to act on his words.

   At the time, many people were pondering peace, with the growth of the nuclear arms race and the escalating situation in Vietnam. Manhattan College was among the schools that eventually contributed to the discussion.

   In 1966, it offered its first course on peace, and by 1971, students could major in peace studies, making it the second-oldest program in the United States. (The pioneer was Manchester College in North Manchester, Ind., which began its program in 1948.) Today dozens of schools have them.

   At the helm of Manhattan's program is Margaret Groarke, a political scientist and thoughtful purveyor of alternatives to conflict. The director of the peace program since 1999, she regularly teaches an introductory peace-studies course, and is also a professor in the school's government department. She spoke with the Monitor recently about the program and her teaching approach.

   What does peace studies include?

   We see it as an interdisciplinary program that allows students to focus their study on the problems of creating peace and justice, and there are five areas we see fitting under that: arms races and war; economic, political, and social justice; conflict creation, management, and resolution; nonviolent philosophies and strategies of resistance; and world community and world government.

   Based on that range of topics, how do you define peace?

   I think, in common parlance, peace means the absence of war. And the first thing that students learn in peace studies is that the absence of war is a very insufficient definition of peace.

   There's a notion in peace studies that there is such a thing as "negative" peace, that we can have the absence of conflict - "I'm not shooting at you right now, and therefore we are at peace" - but the relations between us might not be just. Maybe you're oppressing me, maybe we're barely stifling our desire to kill each other over some territorial dispute.

   That's not peace. It's not peace until we've worked out a just solution to that problem, whatever it might be. And that's what we think of as "positive" peace, and that includes what most people would think of as justice.

   Students sometimes say to me, "Why is it called peace studies? Why isn't it called peace and justice studies?" And what people have said here ... is that that's repetitive: Peace includes justice.

   What approach do you take in your teaching?

   In the introduction to peace studies, I try to expose students to a number of different things, with the idea that they can pick some other courses to follow those ideas through. I try to teach a bit of the philosophy of peace, and some of those ideas about negative and positive [peace].

   Because my own interest has long been in nonviolent movements for peace and justice ... we spend a good bit of time on that, and on understanding that there are other ways to solve problems besides going to war or, on another level, using violence.

   It's easy for people to see in interpersonal relations that there are other ways to solve problems than by violence.... But on the international level, we are not well-versed enough in the nonviolent ways to resolve conflicts and we don't have as much faith in them as we should have, given the history of those strategies being used to avoid war, to resolve problems.

   What are some of the misperceptions students have?

   That hoping for peace is unrealistic. That there's no point in talking about peace in a time of war like this.... That force is the only and/or best form of power.

   A lot of our failure to understand how to create peace is a failure to understand power and how it works. There are lots of ways to exercise power. Think about diplomats. [They] achieve their goals without using military methods.... Students will often say, "Talking isn't going to do anything." But diplomats do a lot by talking, and we need to understand how that is done.

   What teaching tools do you use?

   This fall we're going to begin with John Hersey's [book] "Hiroshima," because I had a discussion with some students about whether the bombing of Hiroshima was necessary.... We do read some of the work of Gandhi [and] the speeches of Martin Luther King Jr. about nonviolence. We read some religious texts and other perspectives on peace.

   One semester we started the class reading a wild novel called "Ishmael" by a man named Daniel Quinn. It is about a gorilla who attempts to lead a human into making better life choices.

   The purpose of starting with this book was to think about how your choices are limited by the paradigm you're in, that there are other, entirely different ways of looking at the world ... and that we need to take that leap to realize a solution to problems that [seem] unsolvable.

   One of the things people always say about studying peace is that it's fine to talk about trying to be peaceful, but when you're dealing with somebody like Hitler or Saddam Hussein, you have to use violence. So one of [the course books] includes some readings about a [French] town that resisted the Nazis nonviolently.

   How did people resist the Nazis?

   The basic strategy is to make it impossible for the occupiers to carry on their business.... In Denmark, people refused to take government positions and left them vacant. People quit and others refused to apply for government jobs.

(c) Copyright 2003. The Christian Science Monitor

[JR: Dona nobis pacem  ]

 

 

[News4]

From: Dick Sidbury (DrJamesSidbury@hotmail.com)
Subject: A liberal friend sent this to me.
This is the only article in this thread 
View: Original Format
Newsgroups: alt.sports.baseball.atlanta-braves
Date: 2003-04-21 19:14:52 PST

He got it from a friend at Manhattan College.

If you're liberal feel free to change clinton to bush, etc.

(or if you prefer you can replace them with suitable members of this forum ;)

=========================

A squad of American soldiers was patrolling along the Iraqi border. To their surprise, they found the badly mangled dead body of an Iraqi soldier in a ditch along side the road.

A short distance up the road, they found a badly mangled American soldier in a ditch on the other side of the road, who was still barely alive.

They ran to him, cradled his blood-covered head and asked him what had happened. "Well," he whispered, "I was walking down this road, armed to the teeth. I came across this heavily armed Iraqi border guard. I looked him right in the eye and shouted, "Saddam Hussein is an unprincipled, lying piece of trash!"

He looked me right in the eye and shouted back, "Bill Clinton, Hillary Clinton, Tom Daschle, Ted Kennedy and most of your Democrats are unprincipled, lying pieces of trash, too!"

"We were standing there shaking hands when the truck hit us."

[JR: Readers know I have a dislike for all politicians. But, this wasn't even funny? ]

 

 

[News5]

Good guy, bad guy -- who knows?
MARK McGUIRE Staff writer
04/22/2003
LIFE & LEISURE;
Times Union  Albany, NY
THREE STAR
D1
(Copyright 2003)

   Here's the thing about actors: Many will go to great lengths to defend their characters as "good guys." It helps them empathize with their role. That's what Albany native Jude Ciccolella is doing now with Mike Novick, the presidential chief of staff he plays on the Fox roller-coaster "24." For more than a season, Novick has been the soothing and unwaveringly loyal confidante of senator-turned-President David Palmer (Dennis Haysbert). 

   Loyal, that is, until last week's episode, which delivered a twist that's surprising even for this ricocheting drama: Novick appears to be working with a White House cabal bent on ousting Palmer on the eve of war.

   "You can expect anything on `24,' " said Ciccolella, a 1965 Christian Brothers Academy grad. "But most people didn't expect me to become a problem." 

   Novick ordered presidential adviser Lynne Kresge (Michelle Forbes) held in a room so she wouldn't reveal the plot. Still, Ciccolella is sticking by his character: "There is a higher good to come from (Novick's actions) than worrying about locking her in ... for a couple of hours." 

   Maybe. Novick joins Jack Bauer (Kiefer Sutherland's "24" character) and Michael Chiklis' Vic Mackey of FX's "The Shield" among a growing list of morally ambiguous characters on television. In a medium once dominated by white hats/black hats, the new fashion statement is gray. 

   Ciccolella, 56, has played bad guys, but insists Novick doesn't belong in their company. "I have no problem liking Mike," Ciccolella said last week from the set, where the season's final two episodes were being filmed. "He is doing everything he thinks is right. And it hurts him tremendously." 

   The Fox drama (10 p.m. Tuesdays, WXXA Ch. 23) has built a cultlike following but still lags in the ratings. (This season, it has been placing in the low 50s among top-rated shows.) This year's real-time plot concerns the hunt for a nuclear weapon in Los Angeles -- a device that was smuggled into the city with the tacit approval of a shadowy homegrown conspiracy that hopes to engineer a U.S. attack on the Middle East.

   Hardcore viewers -- and even crew members -- were taken aback when Ciccolella's Novick joined the group seeking to oust Palmer. "It was pretty much of a shock. I was one of the last bastions of loyalty." 

   "We are not doing anything out of self-aggrandizement," Ciccolella said, defending his character's co-conspirators. "We are doing something out of what we think is best for the country for the moment. 

   "This is not like `Seven Days in May.' This is in the Constitution. The vice president is the spearhead. It's not

illegal." 

   Ciccolella is referring to the 25th Amendment in the Constitution, which allows the vice president, the Cabinet and Congress to declare the president unable to discharge his duties. (A full reading of the amendment could give clues to where the rest of the season may be heading.) 

   Ciccolella is currently on movie screens in another White House tale, the hit Chris Rock comedy "Head of State"; he played an officer in the Christmas release "Star Trek: Nemesis."

   Upcoming, he has a small role in the Ewan McGregor-Renee Zellweger musical "Down with Love," which also includes Saratoga Springs native David Hyde Pierce. And he gets to play Martha Stewart's father in NBC's "Martha Inc.," airing Monday, May 19. 

   "Rick" Ciccolella was a three-sport star at CBA (Jude is his middle name), and played football at Brown. His father, the late Richard S. Ciccolella, is regarded as one of the all-time greatest athletes from this area: In the 1930s, he was a three-sport star at Manhattan College, and is included in the school's hall of fame. His mother, Ann, lives in an area nursing home. 

   The second season of "24" ends on May 20. Ciccolella said that, as in the first season, "A lot of different scenarios are being filmed. They don't know which one they'll use." 

   Ciccolella claims he still doesn't know if he'll be back next year. (Even villains get a second chance on the show: Palmer's scheming wife and Bauer's traitorous ex-mistress have both re-appeared in season two.) 

   "This has been a great run," he said. "If I come back, I come back." 

   If not, he'll miss Mike Novick, a good guy. At least to the man who plays him. 

   Mark McGuire is the Times Union TV/radio writer. His column generally appears Sunday, Tuesday and Friday. Call him at 454-5467 or send e-mail to mmcguire@timesunion.com.

[JR: The son of late Richard S. Ciccolella (????). I found it interesting.]

 

 

[News6]

Copyright 2003 Business Wire, Inc. 
Business Wire
April 17, 2003, Thursday
DISTRIBUTION: Energy Editors/Business Editors/Education Writers
HEADLINE: ExxonMobil and Its Employees Contribute More Than $2.2 Million to New York Colleges and Universities; 87 New York Institutions to Receive Educational Matching Gift Grants
DATELINE: IRVING, Texas, April 17, 2003

ExxonMobil announced today that more than $2.2 million has been donated to 87 colleges and universities in New York through the ExxonMobil Foundation's 2002 Educational Matching Gifts Program. ExxonMobil employees, retirees, surviving spouses and directors contributed more than $709,000 to these New York institutions of higher education in 2002, which was matched by the ExxonMobil Foundation with more than$1.5 million in unrestricted educational grants to those institutions.

Initiated in 1962, the ExxonMobil Foundation's Educational Matching Gift program matches gifts to higher education on a 3-to-1 basis and has provided more than $266 million in gifts to higher education in the United States. This year the combined contributions of ExxonMobil and its employees, retirees, surviving spouses and directors provided more than 900 colleges and universities across the country with more than $22.4 million. Individual donations totaled$6.1 million, and the ExxonMobil Foundation matched that number with an additional $16.2 million in unrestricted grants.

"We are proud that ExxonMobil employees have remained steadfast in their commitment to higher education by donating nearly as much to their colleges and universities as they did last year, despite the difficult economic times we are all facing, " said Kenneth P. Cohen, vice president for public affairs, Exxon Mobil Corporation, and chairman, ExxonMobil Foundation. "We applaud and honor that commitment at ExxonMobil with a 3-to-1 match, the largest educational matching gift program in the country. We feel the combined efforts of the people of ExxonMobil and the ExxonMobil Foundation truly define our collective dedication to education."

Under the ExxonMobil Foundation's Educational Matching Gift Program, a donor can give up to $5,000 a year to colleges and universities with which he or she is affiliated and the Foundation matches those gifts on a 3-to-1 basis up to $15,000. The affiliate requirement is waived for gifts to the United Negro College Fund, the Hispanic Scholarship Fund, and the American Indian College Fund.

Among the 87 New York colleges and universities receiving grants are: Columbia University, Cornell University, Fordham University, New York University, Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, Syracuse University and the United States Military Academy.

ExxonMobil Foundation is the primary philanthropic arm of the Exxon Mobil Corporation in the United States. The Foundation engages in a broad range of philanthropic activities focusing on the communities where Exxon Mobil Corporation has significant operations. In addition, the Foundation supports research and dissemination on selected topics of national interest to the energy industry. Focus areas include education, health and environment. In 2002, ExxonMobil Foundation, Exxon Mobil Corporation, and its divisions and affiliates provided $98 million in contributions worldwide, with more than $41 million dedicated to education.

Attachment: List of New York colleges and universities receiving ExxonMobil Foundation Educational Matching Gift Program Grants.

                  New York Colleges and Universities

   Receiving ExxonMobil Foundation Educational Matching Gift Grants

<extraneous deleted>

Manhattan College            

<extraneous deleted>

CONTACT: ExxonMobil

Media Relations, 972/444-1107 

LOAD-DATE: April 18, 2003 

 

 

[RESUMES]

FROM THE COLLEGE’S WEB SITE: Your resume can be sent to employers who contact our office seeking to fill positions.  For more information contact the Recruitment Coordinator at (718) 862-7965 or Email to JGlenn@manhattan.edu

Actual jobs at MC are at: http://www.manhattan.edu/hrs/jobs 

[No Resumes]

 

[SPORTS]

FROM THE COLLEGE’S WEB SITE: http://www.gojaspers.com [which is no longer at the College, but at a third party. Web bugs are on the pages. (That’s the benefit of being a security weenie!) So, it’s reader beware. Your browser can tell people “stuff” about you, like your email address, leading to SPAM. Forewarned is forearmed.]

[SportsSchedule]

The only reason for putting this here is to give us a chance to attend one of these games and support "our" team.

Date Day Sport Opponent Location Time/Result
4/27/03 Sunday Golf MAAC Championship Lake Buena Vista, FL TBA
4/27/03 Sunday W. Tennis MAAC Championship Flushing, NY TBA
4/27/03 Sunday M. Tennis MAAC Tournament Flushing, NY TBA
4/27/03 Sunday Softball St. John's Jamaica, NY 12:00 PM
4/27/03 Sunday Baseball Iona* New Rochelle, NY 12:00 PM
4/29/03 Tuesday Track & Field Broadmead Invitational Princeton, NJ TBA
4/30/03 Wednesday Baseball Columbia New York, NY 3:00 PM
5/2/03 Friday W. Lacrosse   MAAC Championships   @Marist   TBA 
5/3/03 Saturday W. Lacrosse   MAAC Championships   @Marist   TBA 
5/3/03 Saturday Track & Field   MAAC Outdoor Championships   Lawreneceville, NJ   TBA 
5/3/03 Saturday Baseball   Niagara* (DH)   Niagara University, NY   12:00 PM
5/3/03 Saturday Softball   Fairfield*   Fairfield, CT   12:00 PM
5/4/03 Sunday Track & Field   MAAC Outdoor Championships   Lawrenceville, NJ   TBA 
5/4/03 Sunday Baseball   Niagara*   Niagara University, NY   12:00 PM
5/4/03 Sunday Softball   Iona*   New Rochelle, NY   12:00 PM
5/6/03 Tuesday Baseball   Albany   HOME   3:30 PM
5/9/03 Friday Softball   MAAC Tournament   Stratford, CT   TBA 
5/10/03 Saturday Softball   MAAC Tournament   Stratford, CT   TBA 
5/10/03 Saturday Track & Field   Princeton Invitational   Princeton, NJ   TBA 
5/10/03 Saturday Baseball   Rider* (DH)   HOME   12:00 PM
5/11/03 Sunday Baseball   Rider*   HOME   12:00 PM
5/16/03 Friday Track & Field   IC4A/ECAC Outdoor Championships   Princeton, NJ   TBA 
5/16/03 Friday Baseball   Fairfield* (DH)   Fairfield, CT   12:00 PM
5/17/03 Saturday Track & Field   IC4A/ECAC Outdoor Championships   Princeton, NJ   TBA 
5/17/03 Saturday Baseball   Fairfield*   Fairfield, CT   12:00 PM
5/18/03 Sunday Track & Field   IC4A/ECAC Outdoor Championships   Princeton, NJ   TBA 
5/22/03 Thursday Baseball   MAAC Tournament   Dutchess County Stadium   TBA 
5/23/03 Friday Baseball   MAAC Tournament   Dutchess County Stadium   TBA 
5/24/03 Saturday Baseball   MAAC Tournament   Dutchess County Stadium   TBA 
5/25/03 Sunday Baseball   MAAC Tournament   Dutchess County Stadium   TBA 
5/28/03 Wednesday Baseball   NCAA Regionals   TBA   TBA 
5/29/03 Thursday Baseball   NCAA Regionals   TBA   TBA 
5/29/03 Thursday Track & Field   NCAA Regional   Fairfax, VA   TBA 
5/30/03 Friday Track & Field   NCAA Regional   Fairfax, VA   TBA 
5/30/03 Friday Baseball   NCAA Regionals   TBA   TBA 
5/31/03 Saturday Baseball   NCAA Regionals   TBA   TBA 
5/31/03 Saturday Track & Field   NCAA Regional   Fairfax, VA   TBA 

 

[College Sports]

SACRED HEART TOPS MANHATTAN BASEBALL, 7-2

RIVERDALE, NY (April 22, 2003) – The Sacred Heart Pioneers broke open a close game in the late innings and held on to beat the Manhattan Jaspers 7-2 Tuesday afternoon at Van Cortlandt Park. The Pioneers improve to 10-21 while Manhattan falls to 17-16....

=

WOMEN'S LACROSSE GAME VERSUS MARIST MOVED

Due to poor field conditions the women's lacrosse home game versus Marist has been moved to Leonidoff Field at Marist College in Poughkeepsie, NY. The MAAC contest will begin at 3:30PM...

= =

TUESDAY'S BASEBALL GAME WITH SACRED HEART MOVED TO VAN CORTLANDT PARK

RIVERDALE, NY (April 22, 2003) - Tuesday's baseball game between Manhattan College and Sacred Heart University has been moved to Van Cortlandt Park. The Jaspers and Pioneers will square off at 3:30 PM.

= =

TUESDAY'S SOFTBALL DOUBLEHEADER WITH SAINT PETER'S POSTPONED

RIVERDALE, NY (April 22, 2003) - Tuesday's MAAC softball doubleheader between Manhattan College and Saint Peter's College has been postponed to due poor field conditions. The games have been rescheduled for Friday, April 25, at 3:00 PM at Gaelic Park. Manhattan's next game is slated for Wednesday, April 23, at Fordham University at 3:30 PM.

= = =

JASPERS HOLD ON TO SWEEP PEACOCKS

JERSEY CITY, NJ (April 21, 2003)-The Manhattan College baseball team defeated Saint Peter's 10-9 to complete a three-game sweep over Saint Peter's....

= = = =

 

[News Sports]

BC enjoying its share of sunny days
J.P. PELZMAN, STAFF WRITER
04/15/2003
SPORTS
The Record, Bergen County, NJ
All Editions.=.Two Star B. Two Star P. One Star B
S09
(Copyright 2003 North Jersey Media Group Inc.)

   Bergen Catholic is 5-0, marking the best start in its lacrosse program's history.

   Still, it's hard to decide which fact is more impressive: that the Crusaders have five wins, or that they've actually played five games.

<extraneous deleted> 

   Senior midfielders Brian Murray (12 goals, nine assists) and Christian Schaefers (15 goals, two assists) lead the team in scoring, taking advantage of the special attention teams are paying to Johnson, who is going to Rutgers on a football scholarship. Murray and Schaefers will play lacrosse at Manhattan College.

<extraneous deleted>  

   ***

   J.P. Pelzman's e-mail address is pelzman@northjersey.com

=

Barrington Legion schedules golf outing
Daily Herald Staff Reports
04/11/2003
Sports Extra
Chicago Daily Herald
Lake,C1,F1,F2,M1
(Copyright 2003)

    Wendy's All-Star shootout: The 5th Annual Wendy's All-Star Shootout, a Wendy's High School Heisman Event, is schedule for later this month.

   The Wendy's All-Star Shootout is now entering its fifth year and is widely considered one of the top high school basketball all-star games in the country. The game features top senior high school basketball players from the Chicago area competing against counterparts from New York. Chicago took a 3-1 series lead with a 96- 93 win in 2002.

   This year's game will take place on Sunday, April 20 at the DePaul University Athletic Center in Chicago. Tip-off is at noon.

   Ticket price is $5 and are available through Ticketmaster at (312) 559-1212, on the Web at www.ticketmaster.com and at the DePaul Athletic Center Box Office (on game day only).

   Every year, Chicago and New York are represented by talented players that go on to excel at the collegiate level. In 2003, a total of 18 Wendy's All-Star Shootout Alumni participated in the NCAA Tournament.

   Stars that have participated in the Wendy's All-Star Shootout include Steven Hunter of the Orlando Magic, Dwyane Wade and Todd Townsend from Marquette University's Final Four team, University of Pittsburgh point guard Brandin Knight, University of Cincinnati's Leonard Stokes and Manhattan College star Luis Flores.

= =

ALL-BRONX SELECTIONS
PLAYER PROFILES BY CHRISTINE SAMPSON
04/20/2003
SPORTS
Newsday
QUEENS
B18
Copyright 2003, Newsday. All Rights Reserved.

<extraneous deleted>

Renee Taylor, Scanlan

Taylor's speed, mobility and court perspective have translated into a school record for career points (2,002). The senior point guard averaged 28 points, 6 assists and 4 steals, and scored 30 or more points in five games this  season. Taylor has yet to decide among the colleges recruiting her, including St. John's, Manhattan, Fairleigh Dickinson and Quinnipiac.

Kristen Tracey, Spellman

Coach Jane Morris says Tracey has evolved into one of the most complete players she's ever seen. The senior point guard averaged 21 points and nine rebounds, scored more than 1,000 points in her career and had a season high of 28 in a non-league game against Bishop Loughlin. Tracey has committed to play for Manhattan College next year.

<extraneous deleted>

= = =

ALL-MANHATTAN SELECTIONS
PLAYER PROFILES BY CHRISTINE SAMPSON
04/20/2003
SPORTS
Newsday
QUEENS
B18
Copyright 2003, Newsday. All Rights Reserved.

<extraneous deleted> 

Danielle Cooper, Dwight

Scoring close to 30 points a game was a habit this season for Cooper, who averaged 26.4 points and 9.8 assists. Cooper, a senior, also had two 40-plus games, including 46 points against Dalton. Manhattan College, Fairfield, University of Miami and Alabama-Birmingham are among the schools recruiting Cooper.

 <extraneous deleted> 

= = = =

ALL-STATEN ISLAND SELECTIONS
PLAYER PROFILES BY CHRISTINE SAMPSON
04/20/2003
SPORTS
Newsday
QUEENS
B18
Copyright 2003, Newsday. All Rights Reserved.

<extraneous deleted> 

Melissa Kraft, St. Joseph Hill Academy

Kraft averaged 19.6 points playing point guard for St. Joseph, which went 14-11 this season and made the Diocesan playoffs for the first time in recent memory. Kraft finished with 1,863 points and scored more than 30 points in a game four times this season, leading a young team that otherwise consists of one other senior, four sophomores and three freshmen. Her Division I options include Manhattan College, La Salle, Wagner and Georgetown.

<extraneous deleted>   

= = = = =

Recipe for success
Patrick Garrity
04/18/2003
Sports; D
The Burlington Free Press
01
(c) Copyright 2003, The Burlington Free Press. All Rights Reserved.

UVM's Currier has served up a winning tradition in 15 seasons coaching baseball

By Patrick Garrity

Read Bill Currier's ingredients for building a winning baseball tradition and you'll swear you have the recipe upside-down:

<extraneous deleted> 

"Bill can take an average player and make him a good player; He can take

a good player and make him a great  player,'' said Steve Trimper, the

head coach at Manhattan College who spent four seasons as Currier's

assistant coach.

<extraneous deleted> 

Contact Patrick Garrity at 660-1868 or pgarrity@bfp.burlingtonfreepress.com

= = = = =   =

Thursday morning, April 24, 2003.
LIVERPOOL WINS IN BOTTOM OF 9TH ; MICHELLE MAZZA HITS A SINGLE TO LEFT FIELD, SCORING KATE BLUNDELL FROM THIRD.
M.F. Piraino Staff writer
04/22/2003
Sports
The Post-Standard   Syracuse, NY
Final
D5
(Copyright 2003)

<extraneous deleted>

   Off to college

   All-state soccer player Trinity Reina of Utica Notre Dame signed to play at Manhattan College.

= = = = =   =

 

 

[EMAIL FROM JASPERS]

[Email01]

From: Richie Caf
Sent: Friday, April 18, 2003 12:09 AM
Subject: RE: FELLOW JASPER EMAIL

Hey there! I'm not a Alumni just quite yet buddy, still got 3 weeks left and a physics course that is driving me crazy.  Its funny you mentioned the alum contacts at manhattan because I already had an account under my brothers name.  My dad's also an alumn.  They are both Dentists.  I use the directory to get contacts for jobs and i've sent over like a hundred emails asking for a helping start to a great career in Computers.  I have really good experience and I can do some pretty amazing things with a PC.  However no positive feedback.  The job market is rough.  Just wondering if you work for a company that is looking for raw new talent.  If so please respond so I can forward you a copy of my resume.  Thanks

[JR: <1>  So you are not Vincent M. (1996) Cafarelli. <2> Tsk, tsk. Well, you can recruit them to receive my ezine, make it a family affair. <3> Obviously, your approach needs some refinement. It's called, by National Business Employment Weekly, the "grand faloon" strategy, after the Dutch practice of "Letters of Introduction". <4> I would suggest that email spam is not a substitute for what should be a rifle shot approach. <5> Everyone is always looking for people who solve their problems for them. I have a reading list I can send you if you are interested. I regularly tout Lucht's book and workbook as the absolute blueprint for a job search. <6> Here's the response. I'll look at your resume and may be able to offer some suggestions. BTW, you need to spell check your email and reread it for tone, before you tap send. <7> You're welcome.]

 

 

[Email02]

From: Larry Sullivan '53 A
Sent: Saturday, April 19, 2003 2:07 PM
Subject: Re: jasperjottings20030413.htm

Dear John,

    I received a notice of the 150th Manhattan Reunion schedule for June 7th.  The first event is the Eucharistic Celebration at St. Patrick's, beginning 2:45 PM.  The Reunion Celebration is scheduled at 5:00 PM at Rockefeller Plaza.

   Does anyone know what that event consists of?  Where in the Plaza is it being held?  Is it cocktails and hors d'oeuvres?  Etc.  The price of the ticket is quite clear: $100.00 per person.  The rest is murky.  Can you help?

                                        Larry Sullivan '53 A

[JR: I sent you what I have. And the URL for registration. Hope this helps. ]

 

 

[Email03]

From: Deacon John E. Antenucci  '59S
Sent: Saturday, April 19, 2003 3:36 PM
Subject: Re: jasperjottings20030413.htm

John, based on the return to the original format, I assume you are mending well.  If so, I am glad to see it.  This note is coming from San Antonio, TX where my wife Roni is recuperating from pneumonia.  Please keep her rapid recovery in your prayers.

Thanks,
Deacon John E. Antenucci  '59S

[JR: Yup, other than what appears to be a loss of feeling in the right thumb and index fingers, I'd have to say I am "cured". I am unsure how much to attribute to doctoring and how much to time. Someone said "Medicine is the art of amusing the patient while the body heals itself". I suspect that is truer than we'd like to believe. Hope your wife is doing better. They have some amazing drugs. I had that also several times when I was misdiagnosed as "asthmatic". It used to be touch and go recovery over many weeks at first. Later, with better drugs, it was a few weeks. I guess it all depends. I am sure all our fellow Jaspers will honor your request. With that working for her, how can she not recover? As my prescription, I recommend slapstick comedies. It makes one laugh. Which can't hurt.]

 

 

[Email04]

From: Michael Muolo, Colonel USAF (Class 77)
Sent: Sunday, April 20, 2003 4:37 AM
Subject: Transfer

To all my friends in the class of 77 and fellow Jaspers, I will be departing Stuttgart Germany as Chief of Strategy this Summer 03 and transferring to Washington D.C., Defense Intelligence Agency. I will then enter a 12 month training program to become the US Defense Attache to South Africa, US Embassy. My wife Robin will also enter training with me.  We will proceed to South Africa Jun 04 and remain in country until 07. I wish you all the very best. I will be keeping this e-mail address for contact purposes.

Best wishes,
Michael J. Muolo
Class of 77

 

 

[Email05]

From: George Brew (1950)
Sent: Saturday, April 19, 2003 5:11 PM
Subject: New E-Mail Addresses

Hi Everyone, we're sorry to do this to you but we have separated our e-mail addresses.

The new ones are:

Kathie - <privacy invoked>

George - <privacy invoked>

We will monitor our old address of <privacy invoked>  until June 1st.

Have a Happy Easter!!!

George and Kathie

[JR: Maybe I am the only one who sees the value of redirectors. ]

 

 

[Email06]

From: Edward Peitler
Sent: Sunday, April 20, 2003 7:57 AM
Subject: RE: jasperjottings20030413.htm

John,

Are you able  to forward this to Michael Lepre '81? "Mike...congrats on you new job.  Sounds like things are going well. E-mail me if you would like: <privacy invoked>  Best regards, Ed Peitler"

Thanks

Ed Peitler '70

[JR: It was a news story, so I wouldn't usually have an email address. In this case, I had sent him an invitation so I had a "probable" which I shared with you. Hopefully, he'll get it and respond to you. ]

 

 

[Email07]

From: Bottlik Geza P. (1960)
Sent: Sunday, April 20, 2003 8:52 PM
Subject: Re: Hello from a 1968 Jasper on 09 April 2003

Unfortunately I didn't download the rest of you message on 4/9 and now it is no longer available for download. Would you send it again?

[JR: Done  ]  

 

 

[Email08]

From: Robert Carr (A/64)
Sent: Tuesday, April 22, 2003 10:24 AM
Subject: Re: Hello from a 1968 Jasper on 22 April 2003

Continue to send your newsletter.

 

 

[END OF NEWS]

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FINAL WORDS THIS WEEK

http://www.jewishworldreview.com/cols/williams1.asp

April 16, 2003 / 14 Nisan, 5763
Walter Williams
Call it as it is

=== <begin quote> ===

There's considerable unnecessary confusion and debate on public policy issues that would be more intelligently discussed and resolved if we'd say what is actually meant rather than using euphemistic disguises.

<extraneous deleted>

How about all the government programs that account for at least two-thirds of federal spending, such as: aid to higher education, Medicare, food stamps, welfare or farm subsidies? Are they moral?

To get at the answer, we must first ask where Congress gets the resources to finance these programs. All except the most naive would recognize that neither the Tooth Fairy nor Santa Claus supplies Congress with the money. That means Congress can give one American a dollar only by first taking it away from another American.

Now we can ask the moral question. Is it right to take, through threats, intimidation and coercion, what one American has earned and give it to another American who has not earned it? Or put another way: Is it right for one person to be forcibly compelled to serve the purposes of another person?

<extraneous deleted>

When we make government practices and programs explicit, we see that most of them are immoral. More importantly, we see why our Founders sought to limit the scope of government: The essence of government is force, and most often that force is used to accomplish evil ends.

=== <end quote> ===

Readers here know I love Walter William's ability to cut to the heart of the matter. Just having paid my "fair share" of an unconstitutional and immoral tax, his words really ring true. The Dead Old White Guys really were geniuses to setup a beautiful system; we were too stupid to keep it. One wonders if we can ever get back to original intent, personal responsibility, and low taxation.

Curmudgeon

And that’s the last word.

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